The Sentinel (1977) Review

"Despite often being considered as something of a hack director, Winner does an admirable job of effectively building tension through scenery. As the story progresses, and the focus changes to the apartment building, Winner makes good use of ornate Gothic ornamentation and shadowy corridors to create dread."

Nightmare City (1980) Review

"If you have ever seen an Umberto Lenzi film before, then you know what to expect. The director cut his teeth making giallo films in the 70’s, as well as cannibal films such as Man From the Deep River and Cannibal Ferox.

Unsurprising, then, that this paper-thin plot is used as a vehicle for eye-gouging, throat-slitting, breast-tearing, head-popping."

Splinter (2008) Review

"The Body horror genre capitalises on the innate revulsion of the often creepy, and occasionally mystifying, internal processes of the human body.

And it does so by taking this fear to the logical extremes. The degeneration and annihilation of the physical form is at its heart."

The Thing (1982) Review

"The idea of Antarctica defending itself is almost reflected in the creature itself. Each set piece with the creature is designed to show the Thing as this impossible, living organism desperately trying to survive.

Rob Bottin and his team clearly had a ball designing the monster's various forms."

Zombi 2 (Zombie Flesh Eaters) (1979) Review

"For some reason forever lost to time, the Italian horror cinema of the Seventies and Eighties had an obsessive drive to produce as many zombie movies as possible.

During those two decades, Italian directors created more shambling forms than a drunken flooring company."

Street Trash (1987) Review

"The plot (if one can call it that) concerns a batch of toxic, woefully old wine called Viper that is being sold cheaply to the homeless population of Manhattan. It produces all manner of bizarre effects in its drinkers.

People deliquesce, explode, break down, and fall apart; anything that can be done to transform the human body into a work of modern art."

Society (1989) Review

"It's only at Society's conclusion that we receive answers to our questions. And boy, are we made to regret our desire to understand.

Despite the opening three-quarters of the 100-minute runtime being little more than an ambiguously creepy melodrama, Society's final act serves up a crescendo of macabre sexuality and mind-warping body horror."

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